News

New data: Soul of the Community 2009

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released July 20, 2012


Soul of the Community 2009

Soul of the Community 2009 is the second of three surveys conducted by Gallup in the 26 John S. and James L. Knight Foundation communities in the United States. Community attachment and its impact on economic growth and well-being are the main focus of the study.

New data: Soul of the Community 2010

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released June 29, 2012


Soul of the Community 2010

Soul of the Community 2010 is the last of three surveys conducted by Gallup in the 26 John S. and James L. Knight Foundation communities in the United States. Community attachment and its impact on economic growth and well-being are the main focus of the study.

New data: Soul of the Community 2008

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released May 21, 2012


Soul of the Community 2008

Soul of the Community 2008 is the first of three surveys conducted by Gallup in the 26 John S. and James L. Knight Foundation communities in the United States. Community attachment and its impact on economic growth and well-being are the main focus of the study.

Updated: American Time Use Survey, Activity Summary File 2006-2010

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Updated April 17, 2012


American Time Use Survey, Activity Summary File 2006-2010

To correct issues of weighting, years 2003 to 2005 were removed from originally published 2003 to 2010 data. The multi-year combined data now contain years 2006 to 2010.

New data: Current Population Survey, September 2010

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released April 2, 2012


Current Population Survey, September 2010

The Current Population Survey (CPS) is conducted monthly by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In September 2010, a Volunteer Supplement was added to the standard CPS questionnaire. The resulting data includes information on employment status, demographic characteristics, and volunteer activities during the prior year.

New data: American Community Survey: Artists Extract 2006-2008

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released January 26, 2012


American Community Survey 2006-2008

This 3-year public use microdata sample (PUMS) for 2006-2008 is a subset of the 2006-2008 American Community Survey (ACS) and Puerto Rico Community Survey (PRCS) samples. It contains the same sample as the three 1-year PUMS for 2006, 2007 and 2008. It contains three years of data for housing units and the population from households and the group quarters (GQ) population. The GQ population, housing units and population from households are all weighted to agree with the ACS counts which are an average over the three year period (2006-2008). The ACS sample was selected from all counties across the nation, and all municipios in Puerto Rico. The 2006-2008 PUMS data contain 3,875,950 housing unit records and 8,819,885 person records from households and 245,787 person records from GQs. CPANDA further selected artists from the data to create this subset data.

New data: County Business Patterns [United States, 2000-2009]

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released January 19, 2011


County Business Patterns [United States, 2000-2009]

This dataset extract contains 10 years of County Business Patterns. This extract contains only fields related to the arts with the lowest level of geography being the state level due to lack of reporting at lower levels of geographies for most industry codes related to the arts due to low numbers of reporting establishments. County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides subnational economic data by industry. This series includes the number of establishments, employment during the week of March 12, first quarter payroll, and annual payroll. This data is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark for other statistical series, surveys, and databases between economic censuses.

New data: American Time Use Survey 2003-2010

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released December 01, 2011


American Time Use Survey 2003-2010

This dataset contains 8 years of Activity Summary information from the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). The ATUS measures how people divide their time among life's activities

New data: American Time Use Survey 2010

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released October 13, 2011


American Time Use Survey 2010

The Activity Summary file of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) contains information about the activities and the time spent on those activities of each individual respondent during a 24-hour period.

New data: Information On Artists IV: Special Focus Aging Performing Artists  (NYC) 2011

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released September 21, 2011


Information On Artists IV: Special Focus Aging Performing Artists  (NYC)

he IOAIV: Aging (NYC/LA) study focuses on professional actors, dancers, choreographers, musicians and singers 62 years or older. It tries to understand how artists are supported and integrated within their communities, and how their network structures change over time and to understand how performing artists mature into old age–artistically, emotionally, financially and chronologically

New data: Information On Artists IV: Special Focus Aging Performing Artists  (LA) 2011

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released September 20, 2011


Information On Artists IV: Special Focus Aging Performing Artists  (LA)

he IOAIV: Aging (NYC/LA) study focuses on professional actors, dancers, choreographers, musicians and singers 62 years or older. It tries to understand how artists are supported and integrated within their communities, and how their network structures change over time and to understand how performing artists mature into old age–artistically, emotionally, financially and chronologically

Data update: American Time Use Survey 2009

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Updated September 14, 2011
Originally Released July 19, 2010


American Time Use Survey 2009

Bureau of Labor Statistics announced that "the Activity summary file (of the 2009 American Time Use Survey), originally released June 22, 2010, was re-released on June 22, 2011, with corrected data for the weekly earnings variable TRERNWA. No other data were changed. As initially released, TRERNWA was not correct because overtime earnings were omitted from about 170 cases." CPANDA version is updated corresponding to the data correction. See Bureau of Labor Statistics web site for more information.

New data: American Time Use Survey 2009

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released July 19, 2010


American Time Use Survey 2009

The Activity Summary file of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) contains information about the activities and the time spent on those activities of each individual respondent during a 24-hour period.

New data: Survey of Newspaper Visual Arts Critics in America 2002

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released June 22, 2010


Survey of Newspaper Visual Arts Critics in America 2002

The National Arts Journalism Program conducted a survey to ask "whether the popular news media provide sufficient exposure for artists, arts institutions and the ideas that govern their work."

New data: American Time Use Survey 2003

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released May 04, 2010


American Time Use Survey 2003

The Activity Summary file of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) contains information about the activities and the time spent on those activities of each individual respondent during a 24-hour period.

New data: American Time Use Survey 2004

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released April 01, 2010


American Time Use Survey 2004

The Activity Summary file of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) contains information about the activities and the time spent on those activities of each individual respondent during a 24-hour period.

New data: American Time Use Survey 2006

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released March 01, 2010


American Time Use Survey 2006

The Activity Summary file of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) contains information about the activities and the time spent on those activities of each individual respondent during a 24-hour period.

American Time Use Survey 2005

The Activity Summary file of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) contains information about the activities and the time spent on those activities of each individual respondent during a 24-hour period.

New data: Survey of Public Participation in the Arts 1982-2008 Cumulative file

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released January 19, 2010


Survey of Public Participation in the Arts 1982-2008 Cumulative file

This data set combines the existing data for the 1982, 1985, 1992, 2002, and 2008 SPPA surveys. 1997 is not included due to its employment of a different methodology. The data set offers information on Americans' participation in the arts, including ballet, opera, plays, museums, and concerts. Respondents were asked a core set of questions about their participation in, and frequency of attending, art performances and events in the following categories: jazz music, classical music, opera, musicals, plays (nonmusical), ballet, other dance, art museums, arts-crafts fairs, and historical park/monument sites.

New data: American Time Use Survey 2008

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released October 26, 2009


American Time Use Survey 2008

The Activity Summary file of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) contains information about the activities and the time spent on those activities of each individual respondent during a 24-hour period.

CPANDA site system update

CPANDA site will be undergoing sytems updates in the next few months, to be completed by January 2010. Users may see some changes to the site during the update. If you notice any problems, please contact cpanda@princeton.edu.

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released September 03, 2009

New data: American Time Use Survey 2007

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released September 02, 2009


American Time Use Survey 2007

The Activity Summary file of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) contains information about the activities and the time spent on those activities of each individual respondent during a 24-hour period.

New data: American Community Survey: Artists Extract 2004-2006

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released August 20, 2009


American Community Survey: Artists Extract 2004-2006

American Community Survey, 2004-2006 [United States]: Public Use Microdata Sample: Artist Extract File was prepared by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from data collected by the Census Bureau. NEA extracted public use microdata samples (PUMS) relevant to research about artist occupations into Artist Extract Files to reduce file size and reduce time and costs for researchers interested in analyzing these data. The data include information on artists' demographics, place of residence, family, housing, work, income, and military experience.

New data: American Community Survey: Artists Extract 2003-2005

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released August 19, 2009


American Community Survey: Artists Extract 2003-2005

American Community Survey, 2003-2005 [United States]: Public Use Microdata Sample: Artist Extract File was prepared by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from data collected by the Census Bureau, combining 2003, 2004, and 2005 data. NEA extracted public use microdata samples (PUMS) relevant to research about artist occupations into Artist Extract Files to reduce file size and reduce time and costs for researchers interested in analyzing these data. The data include information on artists' demographics, place of residence, family, work, income, and military experience.

New data: Survey of Public Participation in the Arts 2008 [United States]

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released June 15, 2009


Survey of Public Participation in the Arts 2008 [United States]

This data set offers information on Americans' participation in the arts, including ballet, opera, plays, museums, and concerts, during 2007. The sixth in a series of national studies on arts participation sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts since 1982, the 2008 SPPA was conducted by the Census Bureau as a supplement to the May 2008 Current Population Survey (CPS). Respondents were asked a core set of questions about their participation in, and frequency of attending, art performances and events in the following categories: jazz music, classical music, opera, musicals, plays (nonmusical), ballet, other dance, art museums, arts-crafts fairs, and historical park/monument sites. The questionnaire also included questions about exposure to the arts via the media, both broadcast and recorded. Other questions measured the amount and type of leisure reading in which respondents engaged in the last year, measured separately for plays, poetry, novels and short stories. A series of questions measured art making and performance. Questions were also asked about training and exposure to the arts, musical and artistic preferences, length of travel to artistic events, school-age socialization in the arts, and computer usage related to artistic information.

Coming Soon: Survey of Public Participation in the Arts

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211


Survey of Public Participation in the Arts

This data set offers information on Americans' participation in the arts, including ballet, opera, plays, museums, and concerts, during 2007. The sixth in a series of national studies on arts participation sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts since 1982, the 2008 SPPA was conducted by the Census Bureau as a supplement to the May 2008 Current Population Survey (CPS). Respondents were asked a core set of questions about their participation in, and frequency of attending, art performances and events in the following categories: jazz music, classical music, opera, musicals, plays (nonmusical), ballet, other dance, art museums, arts-crafts fairs, and historical park/monument sites. The questionnaire also included questions about exposure to the arts via the media, both broadcast and recorded. Other questions measured the amount and type of leisure reading in which respondents engaged in the last year, measured separately for plays, poetry, novels and short stories. A series of questions measured art making and performance. Questions were also asked about training and exposure to the arts, musical and artistic preferences, length of travel to artistic events, school-age socialization in the arts, and computer usage related to artistic information.

New data: Taking Note: A Study of Composers and New Music Activity in the U.S. (2008)

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released May 13, 2009


Taking Note: A Study of Composers and New Music Activity in the U.S. (2008)

Commissioned by the American Music Center (AMC) and the American Composers Forum (ACF), the two largest composer service organizations in the nation, the Research Center for Arts and Culture examined how composers create their work within the broad new music landscape. As RCAC’s Taking Note is the first known national study of living American composers, the research methodology broadly included nearly 100 interviews with composers and field experts from around the country, a national online survey, focus groups, and a series of in-depth investigations into innovative resources available to composers. The report includes insights into composers’ work, business practices, income, affiliations, collaborations, diversity and education along with extensive discussion on the opportunities and challenges facing the field of new music. Additionally, RCAC posits a series of recommendations for how composers’ work may be better employed within the American musical ecology and provides a series of spotlights showcasing the work of organizations breaking new ground for composers in the United States

New data: Artists' Extract 2000

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released May 12, 2009


Artists' Extract 2000

Census of Population and Housing, 2000 [United States]: Public Use Microdata Sample: Artist Extract File was prepared by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from data collected by the Census Bureau in the 2000 decennial census. NEA extracted public use microdata samples (PUMS) relevant to research about artist occupations into Artist Extract Files to reduce file size and reduce time and costs for researchers interested in analyzing these data. The files contain records of all persons in households with one or more persons having a detailed occupation code considered "artist" by NEA. These occupations include: actors and directors; announcers; architects; authors; dancers; designers; musicians and composers; painters, sculptors, craft-artists, and artist printmakers; photographers; teachers of art, drama, and music in higher education; and artists, performers, and related workers not elsewhere classified.

New data: Creative Community Index: Survey of Community Leaders [2005]

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released April 23, 2009


Creative Community Index 2005: Survey of Community Leaders

One aspect of the 2005 Creative Community Index was a survey of Silicon Valley leaders. Respondents were asked about their organization's ability to attract and retain creative workers to Silicon Valley, as well as their participation, as an individual and with children, in arts and related activities.

New data: Creative Community Index: Survey of Cultural Organizations [2002]

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released January 14, 2009


Creative Community Index: Survey of Cultural Organizations [2002]

One aspect of the 2002 Creative Community Index was a survey of arts and cultural organizations in the Santa Clara County. Organizations were asked a series of questions about their artistic products and programs, organizational capacity, and funding sources in an effort to gather a range of data about the current health and vitality of nonprofit arts groups in the region. The Creative Community Index project was conducted by Cultural Initiatives Silicon Valley in partnership with the City of San Jose Office of Cultural Affairs, Americans for the Arts, and the Knight Foundation.

New data: Giving and Volunteering: 1992

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released August 26, 2008


Giving and Volunteering: 1992

"Beginning April 3, and ending May 17, 1992, The Gallup Organization conducted in-home personal interviews with 2,671 American adults, 18 years of age and older for INDEPENDENT SECTOR (IS). The purpose of these interviews was to provide accurate trend data about the patterns of and the motivations for giving and volunteering in the United States."

New data: Information on Artists III: Above the Ground: Special Focus New York City Aging Artists

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released July 24, 2008


Information on Artists III: Above the Ground: Special Focus New York City Aging Artists

The purpose of Information on Artists III: Special Focus New York City Aging Artists (IOAIII Aging) is to understand how artists-who often reach artistic maturity and increased artistic satisfaction as they age-are supported and integrated within their communities and how their network structures change over time. Past evidence shows that as people age, they often become more isolated from each other, making it difficult for organizations to serve them both individually and as a group. While artists have a long history of self-sustaining mechanisms sometimes outside the mainstream system, the aging process poses particular challenges that artists themselves may no longer be able to meet. At a time when many artists are maturing in their art, such needs range from adequate healthcare and retirement savings to realizing the outcome of one’s career expectations and finding a community of colleagues and a stimulating environment where creative work can be nurtured. This study by the Research Center for Arts and Culture (RCAC) at Columbia University’s Teachers College, provides the first needs assessment of aging artists in the New York Metro Area.

New data: Survey of Arts and Cultural Organizations 2000

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released July 15, 2008


Survey of Arts and Cultural Organizations 2000

The Survey of Arts and Cultural Organizations [2000], conducted by the Urban Institute, was part of a series of surveys evaluating the Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation (CPCP) initiative. The study recorded operating characteristics, performance/exhibition venues, audience expansion and diversification strategies, and organizational partnerships of government or not-for-profit art and culture organizations in five geographic areas: the Kansas City metropolitan area; Humboldt County, California; Silicon Valley, California; Southeastern Michigan; and Boston, Massachusetts. The CPCP initiative and the evaluative studies were funded by the Wallace-Reader's Digest Funds.

New data: Giving and Volunteering: 1994

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released June 24, 2008


Giving and Volunteering: 1994

From April 22 to May 15, 1994, The Gallup Organization conducted "in-home personal interviews with 1,509 adult Americans, 18 years of age and older. The purpose of these interviews was to gather trend data on charitable behavior; to explore behavioral and motivational factors that influence giving and volunteering; to identify the economic conditions and tax laws affecting giving and volunteering; and, chart public attitudes about a variety of issues as they may relate to the climate of giving and volunteering in the United States."

New data: Central Opera Service Bulletin Performance Listings 1959-1965

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released June 23, 2008


Central Opera Service Bulletin Performance Listings 1959-1965

The Performance Listings of the Central Opera Service Bulletin includes opera performances and workshops held U.S. nationwide and the world. Listed information includes performance organization names, location, opera title, and staff involved in the performances.

New data: Giving and Volunteering: 2001

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released May 23, 2008


Giving and Volunteering: 2001

The Giving and Volunteering in the United States 2001 survey was a random digit dial (RDD) telephone survey conducted by Westat for Independent Sector from May 14, 2001 to July 22, 2001 with a representative national sample of 4,216 adults 21 years of age or older. According to Independent Sector, "the purpose of these surveys is to provide reliable information about volunteering and giving patterns and the motivations that correlate with such behavior."

New data: Central Opera Service Bulletin Performance Listings 1966-1990

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released May 13, 2008


Central Opera Service Bulletin Performance Listings 1966-1990

The Performance Listings of the Central Opera Service Bulletin includes opera performances and workshops held U.S. nationwide and the world. Listed information includes performance organization names, location, opera title, and staff involved in the performances.

New data: Giving and Volunteering: 1996

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released April 02, 2008


Giving and Volunteering: 1996

Beginning May 4 and ending June 16, 1996, The Gallup Organization conducted in-home personal interviews with 2,719 adults, 18 years of age and older for INDEPENDENT SECTOR (IS). The purpose of these interviews was to gather trend data on charitable behavior; identify certain economic conditions and tax laws affecting giving and volunteering; and, chart public attitudes about a variety of issues as they may relate to the climate of giving and volunteering in the United States.

New data: Giving and Volunteering: 1999

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released January 11, 2008


Giving and Volunteering: 1999

During May, June, and July 1999, The Gallup Organization conducted in-home personal interviews with 2,553 adults, 18 years of age and older for Independent Sector (IS). The purpose of these interviews was to provide accurate trend data about the patterns of and the motivations for giving and volunteering in the United States.

New data: Giving and Volunteering: 1990

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released December 17, 2007


Giving and Volunteering: 1990

Beginning March 23, and ending May 20, 1990, The Gallup Organization conducted in-home personal interviews with 2,727 American adults, 18 years of age and older for Independent Sector (IS). The purpose of these interviews was to provide accurate trend data about the patterns of and the motivations for giving and volunteering in the United States.

New data: Giving and Volunteering: 1988

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released August 01, 2007


Giving and Volunteering: 1988

Beginning March 8, and ending March 22, 1988, The Gallup Organization conducted in-home personal interviews with 2,775 American adults, 18 years of age and older for Independent Sector (IS). The purpose of the interviews was to provide accurate trend data about the patterns of and the motivations for giving and volunteering in the United States.

New data: State of the First Amendment 2006 [United States]

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released June 06, 2007


State of the First Amendment 2006 [United States]

The State of the First Amendment survey, conducted annually (since 1997, except for 1998) for the First Amendment Center by the Center for Survey Research and Analysis at the University of Connecticut, examines public attitudes toward the freedoms of speech, press, and religion and the rights of assembly and petition. Core questions, asked each year, include awareness of First Amendment freedoms, overall assessments of whether there is too much or too little freedom of speech, press, and religion in the U.S., levels of tolerance for various types of public expression (such as flag-burning and singing songs with potentially offensive lyrics), levels of tolerance for various journalistic behaviors, attitudes toward prayer in schools, and level of support for amending the Constitution to prohibit flag-burning or defacement. Additional (non-core) questions asked in the 2004 survey include attitudes about the effort to amend the Constitution to ban flag-burning, proposals to expand regulation of so-called indecent material in the media, attempts by government officials and private advocates to lower the "wall of separation between church and state," and scandals involving made-up stories and facts at major news organizations.

New data: Reporting the Arts Survey 2003

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released May 10, 2007


Reporting the Arts Survey 2003

Reporting the Arts II [2003], conducted by the National Arts Journalism Program at Columbia University, analyzed the arts-and-culture coverage by three national newspapers and 17 metropolitan daily newspapers in ten markets (weekday editions, plus Saturday and Sunday editions as applicable) during the month of October 2003. Each article was classified according to the following attributes: prominence in the newspaper, byline (staffer, freelancer, syndicated columnist, or newswire), length, focus (local, national, etc.), type of article, and the artistic discipline covered. The data were collected and analyzed by ADT Research. Funding for the study and report was provided by The Pew Charitable Trusts, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, The Rockefeller Foundation, Netherlands Foundation for Visual Arts, Design and Architecture, and The Fund for Amateur Art and Performing Art.

New data: Artists Training and Career Project: Painters 1991 [United States]

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released February 21, 2007


Artists Training and Career Project: Painters 1991 [United States]

The Artists Training and Career Project: Painters. 1991. was conducted by Joan Jeffri for the Research Center for Arts and Culture (RCAC) at Teachers College, Columbia University. Painters in the United States were surveyed on their training and career development. Topics include training and preparation for a painting career, entry into painting careers, acceptance in the marketplace, critical evaluation, public response, involvement in professional organizations, and career satisfaction. Funding for the study was provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA).

New data: National Social Survey 2004 [United States]

Press contact: Bobray Bordelon, Project Manager
(609) 258-3211
Released February 13, 2007


National Social Survey 2004 [United States]

The National Social Survey is designed to provide an in-depth view of the nation's social health by examining how Americans experience important aspects of daily life, such as social and economic well-being and community participation and engagement. The Survey was created at the Institute for Innovation in Social Policy as part of a long-term effort to develop instruments that monitor the state of society in areas different from those that are assessed by traditional business-economic indicators. A prior wave of the study was conducted in 2002.

New data: National Social Survey 2002: Arts and Culture Survey [United States]

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released September 06, 2006


National Social Survey 2002: Arts and Culture Survey [United States]

The National Social Survey 2002: Survey of Arts and Culture measured Americans' social wellbeing with particular emphasis on engagement in arts and culture. It is a companion to the National Social Survey 2002 which measured American's social wellbeing more generally.

National Social Survey 2004: Arts and Culture Survey [United States]

The National Social Survey 2004: Survey of Arts and Culture measured Americans' social wellbeing with particular emphasis on engagement in arts and culture. It is a companion to the National Social Survey 2004 which measured American's social wellbeing more generally.

Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: Artist Extract File

Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: Public Use Microdata Sample: Artist Extract File was prepared by the National Endowment for the Arts from data collected by the Census Bureau in the 1980 decennial census. The NEA extracted public use microdata samples (PUMS) relevant to research about artist occupations into Artist Extract Files to reduce file size and reduce time and costs for researchers interested in analyzing these data. The files contain records of all persons in households with one or more persons having a detailed occupation code considered "artist" by the NEA.

Creative Community Index 2005: Survey of Silicon Valley Residents

Creative Community Index: Survey of Silicon Valley Residents [2005], produced by Cultural Initiatives Silicon Valley, surveyed adult residents of Santa Clara County as part of a major research initiative to develop quantitative measures of cultural participation and creativity in the Silicon Valley. Respondents were asked about their behavior and beliefs regarding arts and culture in their community.

Artists Training and Career Project: Craftspeople [United States, 1990]

The Artists Training and Career Project: Craftspeople [1990] was conducted by Joan Jeffri for the Research Center for Arts and Culture (RCAC) at Teachers College Columbia University. Craftspeople in the United States were surveyed on their training and career development. Topics include training and preparation for a craft career, entry into craft careers, acceptance in the marketplace, critical evaluation, public response, involvement in professional organizations, and career satisfaction.

Americans and the Arts 1984

The 1984 Americans and the Arts was the fourth in a series of studies measuring participation in and attitudes about the arts and arts in education. Topics include attendance, participation, art and education, funding, individual artists, TV and the arts, children and the arts, and support for the arts.

Craft Artist Membership Organizations 1978 [United States]

The Craft Artist Membership Organizations Survey 1978 collected data on membership characteristics, organizational structure, organizational purposes and activities, funding, and the problems faced by craft artist membership organizations.

New data: American Symphony Orchestra Repertoires 1842-1970

New on CPANDA This Month:

  • New Data Set: American Symphony Orchestra Repertoires 1842-1970
  • New Quick Fact: "Which composers have historically been the most prominent in orchestra repertoires?"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released November 22, 2005


American Symphony Orchestra Repertoires 1842-1970

Between 1940 and 1972, Kate Hevner Mueller and a research team based at Indiana University collected data on the repertoires of 27 major symphony orchestras in the United States. These data were published in print in 1973 in the book Twenty-Seven Major American Symphony Orchestras: A History and Analysis of Their Repertoires, Seasons 1842-43 through 1969-70; they have now been digitized by CPANDA with assistance from Document Solutions in Oakland, CA.

American Symphony Orchestra Repertoires 1842-1970 contains many string variables, so analyses may require that the data be downloaded for use in software other than the online SDA analysis program used by CPANDA's online analysis tools. The data are available in CPANDA's standard download formats, and they are also available as an Excel workbook or as a PDF of the original printed data. The Excel and PDF files can be obtained on the Related Materials page.

American Symphony Orchestra Repertoires 1842-1970 allows analyses such as:

How have orchestra repertoires changed over time?

When did non-European composers emerge in the repertoires of major symphony orchestras?

These and other questions can be answered through data from the American Symphony Orchestra Repertoires 1842-1970.


New Quick Fact: "Which composers have historically been the most prominent in orchestra repertoires?"

According to data from American Symphony Orchestra Repertoires 1842-1970, only Mendelssohn, Beethoven, and Wagner held the honor of most prominent composer in major US orchestra repertoires during the thirteen decades of the study. The top 5 composers in each decade showed a little more fluctuation over time. American composers grew in prominence during the 1900s. Results are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

New data: State of the First Amendment 2005

New on CPANDA This Month:

  • New Data Set: State of the First Amendment 2005
  • Updated Quick Fact: "How Supportive are Americans of Freedom of Expression?"
  • New Quick Fact: "What motivates Kansas City residents to participate in arts and culture?"
  • Presentation: "40 Years of Empirical Research on Arts & Cultural Participation and Artists: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go From Here?"


Released October 25, 2005


The State of the First Amendment 2005

The State of the First Amendment 2005 is the eighth in a series of surveys, sponsored by the First Amendment Center, that measure public attitudes regarding current levels of First Amendment freedoms in the U.S., levels of tolerance for various types of public expression and journalistic behaviors, and awareness of First Amendment freedoms. In addition to these core questions, the 2005 survey gauged public opinion on government regulation of broadcast television.

The State of the First Amendment 2005 allows analysis of questions such as:

Overall how much freedom do you think students in public high schools have to express themselves: too little, too much, or about right?

In your view, who should be primarily responsible for keeping inappropriate television programming away from children: parents, government officials or broadcasters?

These and other questions can be answered through data from the State of the First Amendment 2005.


Updated Quick Fact: "How Supportive are Americans of Freedom of Expression?"

While the public affirms support for the rights granted by the First Amendment in the abstract, findings from the State of the First Amendment 2005 survey show that significant numbers of Americans (in some cases, a majority) would impose restrictions on particular forms of expression.

A special addition to the Quick Fact explores American attitudes toward government regulation of broadcast television.

Readers will also be able to explore trends in support for freedom of expression since 1997 when the State of the First Amendment survey was first conducted.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.


New Quick Fact: "What motivates Kansas City residents to participate in arts and culture?"

According to the Cultural Participation Survey 1998, Kansas City residents who attended at least one arts or cultural event in the prior year did so primarily for social or civic reasons. The Quick Fact explores a multitude of reasons for cultural participation in Kansas City. Results are available in downloadable graphs; further exploration of the data can be conducted using CPANDA's online analysis tools.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.


Presentation: "40 Years of Empirical Research on Arts & Cultural Participation and Artists: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go From Here?"

Also new at CPANDA this month is a presentation (in PowerPoint format) given on October 7, 2005 at the 2005 annual conference on Social Theory, Politics and the Arts by Larry McGill, Director of Research & Planning at CPANDA: "40 Years of Empirical Research on Arts & Cultural Participation and Artists: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go From Here?". It summarizes the state of empirical research on arts participation and on artists, identifies relevant national and local surveys, and suggests next steps for enriching the field of cultural policy.

View the presentation and CPANDA's summary material...


What do you think of the new CPANDA web site?
We're eager to hear feedback from our users about the redesigned CPANDA web site. Please send us your thoughts by e-mailing cpanda@princeton.edu.

New data: Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation [1998, 2000]

New on CPANDA This Month:

  • Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation [1998, 2000]
  • Information on Artists II [1997]
  • Re-Release of Information on Artists 1989

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released September 21, 2005


Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation [1998, 2000]

In the Community Partnerships for Cultural Participation (CPCP) initiative, a total of ten community foundations around the country received grants from the Wallace Foundation to broaden, deepen, and diversify arts and cultural participation. The Urban Institute was commissioned to evaluate the initiative through surveys in a selection of these communities.

CPANDA has now archived two of those surveys: The Community Participation Survey 1998 and The Survey of Arts and Cultural Organizations 2000.

The Community Participation Survey 1998 measured the cultural participation of individuals in the following regions: the Kansas City metropolitan area; Humboldt County, California; and three communities in California's Silicon Valley -- Mayfair (a section of San Jose), Milpitas, and Gilroy.

The Community Participation Survey 1998 allows analysis of questions such as:

In the past 12 months, did you go to any cultural events or activities at concert hall or theater or performing arts center?

When you were growing up, how often did your parents or other adults take you to art or cultural events or activities?

These and other questions can be answered through data from The Community Participation Survey 1998.

The Survey of Arts and Cultural Organizations 2000 examined the audience diversification strategies and organizational partnerships of government or not-for-profit art and culture organizations in five communities: the Kansas City metropolitan area; Humboldt County, California; Silicon Valley, California; Southeastern Michigan; and Boston, Massachusetts.

The Survey of Arts and Cultural Organizations 2000 allows analysis of questions such as:

In the past year, approximately how many people participated as volunteers or received only nominal pay for their activities with your organization?

Over the last year, has your organization done anything to increase participation in your activities by young people or families?

These and other questions can be answered through data from The Survey of Arts and Cultural Organizations 2000 .

Due to a recently discovered error, the Survey of Arts and Cultural Organizations 2000 has been removed from the archive. If you have any questions, please contact Larry McGill at 609-258-6437 or lmcgill@princeton.edu


Information on Artists [1989, 1997, 2004]

With this month's release of Information on Artists II [1997] and the re-release of Information on Artists 1989, researchers can now obtain and analyze data from all three waves of the Information on Artists series at CPANDA.

Information on Artists was a groundbreaking study of artists' work-related, human, and social service needs conducted by Joan Jeffri of the Research Center for Arts and Culture (RCAC) at Teachers College, Columbia University. The first wave in 1989 included artists from ten cities: Boston, Cape Cod, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Minneapolis/St. Paul, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and western Massachusetts. The 1997 wave was conducted in four of the original cities: Los Angeles, Minneapolis/St. Paul, New York, and San Francisco. The 2004 wave was restricted to artists in the San Francisco Bay area.

The survey asked artists about health coverage and insurance, life insurance, retirement plans, credit, living/working space, and legal and financial service needs. A selection of artists who participated in the 1997 wave was re-contacted in 2004 to participate in a small longitudinal component of the study.

Information on Artists allows analysis of questions such as:

What is the approximate monthly operational cost of your current primary art work space, including utilities, rent or mortgage, and taxes?

Please check the category that indicates your total income from work as an artist [last year].

Do you hold copyright in some artistic work of your own creation?

These and other questions can be answered through data from Information on Artists [1989, 1997, 2004].


What do you think of the new CPANDA web site?
We're eager to hear feedback from our users about the redesigned CPANDA web site. Please send us your thoughts by e-mailing cpanda@princeton.edu.

New data: The Six Cities Trusteeship Project: Trustee Biographical Dataset [1931, 1961, 1991]

New on CPANDA This Month:

  • The Six Cities Trusteeship Project: Trustee Biographical Dataset [1931, 1961, 1991]
  • New Quick Fact: "Gender diversity on the boards of large non-profit cultural institutions"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released August 17, 2005


The Six Cities Trusteeship Project: Trustee Biographical Dataset [1931, 1961, 1991]

The Six Cities Trusteeship Project was a research endeavor measuring the demographics and elite status of non-profit trustees in Atlanta, Boston, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Minneapolis/St. Paul, and Philadelphia. It was designed to chart and understand the changes in the scope, scale, diversity, growth, and role of nonprofit trusteeship in the United States from 1931 to 1991.

The study was conducted between 1992 and 1994 by research teams located in or near each city of interest. Researchers collected data from all available sources, including organizational representatives, historical directories, newspaper articles, and local archives. It was funded by the Lilly Endowment and coordinated by Rikki Abzug, then based at the Program on Non-Profit Organizations at Yale University.

The Six Cities Trusteeship Project allows analyses such as:

How has the percentage of "elite" trustees on nonprofit boards (that is, trustees listed in elite directories, such as the Who's Who or the Social Register), changed over time?

How do the trustees of cultural institutions differ from those of community foundations?

The responses to these and other questions are available from the The Six Cities Trusteeship Project: Trustee Biographical Dataset [1931, 1961, 1991].


Quick Fact: "Gender diversity on the boards of large non-profit cultural institutions"

According to The Six Cities Trusteeship Project, in 1931 women had no representation on the boards of Boston's largest cultural institutions, yet they held 26% of the seats on the board of Philadelphia's symphony orchestra. How did women's cultural trusteeship change in Atlanta, Boston, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Minneapolis/St. Paul, and Philadelphia between 1931 and 1991? Results are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.


What do you think of the new CPANDA web site?
We're eager to hear feedback from our users about the redesigned CPANDA web site. Please send us your thoughts by e-mailing cpanda@princeton.edu.

New data: Creative Community Index: Survey of Silicon Valley Residents [2002]

New on CPANDA This Month:

  • Creative Community Index: Survey of Silicon Valley Residents [2002]
  • New Quick Fact: "Arts Exposure of Children in the Silicon Valley"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released July 20, 2005


Creative Community Index: Survey of Silicon Valley Residents [2002]

Creative Community Index: Survey of Silicon Valley Residents surveyed a diverse sample of adult residents of Santa Clara County, California about their creative outlets, participation in arts and cultural activities, and attitudes about arts and culture in their community. The survey was conducted in 2002 by Cultural Initiatives Silicon Valley in partnership with The Knight Foundation, Americans for the Arts, and the City of San Jose Office of Cultural Affairs.

Creative Community Index: Survey of Silicon Valley Residents allows analysis of questions such as:

In terms of geography, how do you define your cultural community? In other words, what area do you consider as the place where you do most of your cultural activities?

Can you think of a work of public art in your neighborhood or city?

The responses to these and other questions are available from the Creative Community Index.


Quick Fact: "Arts Exposure of Children in the Silicon Valley"

According to data from Creative Community Index: Survey of Silicon Valley Residents [2002], 96% of parents of school-aged children stated that arts education classes should be required for all school children. The Quick Fact also examines school-aged children's attendance at museums and live performances. Results are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.


Note to CPANDA visitors: Please let us know if you come across any problems or errors while visiting our newly redesigned CPANDA web site. E-mail the details of any problem you may encounter to cpanda@princeton.edu. Thank you for your help.

New data: Information on Artists III: San Francisco [2004]

Re-Designed CPANDA Web Site Now Live!

New on CPANDA This Month:

  • Information on Artists III: San Francisco [2004]
  • New Quick Fact: "The Arts & the Internet: How Have Technology and the Internet Impacted San Francisco Area Artists?"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released June 29, 2005


Re-Designed CPANDA Web Site Conveys Excitement about the Arts and Improves Usability of Arts-and-Culture Data

Users entering the CPANDA web site will notice the changes immediately. Images of the arts are on every page. Frequently used areas of the site are highlighted to reduce the amount of navigation needed. Our quick data analysis tool, once known as FACTOID, is easier than ever. Extensive user testing showed that users with no prior statistical experience could get real answers and valid results from the new CPANDA site.

New CPANDA features include a subject list for browsing data sets, an extensive Help Center and glossary, and color graphs displayed with your data analysis results.

In the event that we have overlooked a bug on the new site, please help us by e-mailing cpanda@princeton.edu with the details of the problem.


Information on Artists III: San Francisco [2004]

Information on Artists III surveyed 246 artists in the San Francisco Bay area on their work-related human and social service needs. The survey was conducted during January 2004 by Joan Jeffri of the Research Center for Arts and Culture at Teachers College Columbia University.

Information on Artists III allows analysis of questions such as:

What is the approximate monthly operational cost of your current primary art work space, including utilities, rent or mortgage, and taxes?

How often as an artist during 2003 have you donated work or services?

See data ....


Quick Fact: "The Arts & the Internet: How Have Technology and the Internet Impacted San Francisco Area Artists?"

According to data from Information on Artists III: San Francisco [2004], artists in the San Francisco Bay area were highly divided on the issue of unpaid downloading of artistic works. Further results in the Quick Fact include the percentage of area artists who used the internet to market and disseminate their work. Results are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

New data: American Symphony Orchestra Repertoires 1842-1970

Now available on CPANDA:

  • Americans and the Arts V [1987]

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released March 16, 2005


Americans and the Arts V [1987]

Americans and the Arts V [1987] is the fifth in a series of studies available on CPANDA. It measured arts attendance, participation, and support as well as attitudes about artists, arts education, funding of arts and cultural institutions, and childhood exposure to the arts.

Americans and the Arts V allows analysis of questions such as:

How important do you think it is to businesses and the economy of this community to have facilities such as museums, theaters, and concert halls available -- very important, somewhat important, of minor importance, or not at all important?

Do you think there is more arts and cultural programming on commercial TV channels, on cable channels, or on public broadcasting?

The responses to these and other questions from Americans and the Arts V [1987] are available at: Americans and the Arts V

CPANDA's current holdings in the Americans and the Arts series can be browsed or downloaded at: Americans and the Arts

New data: American Symphony Orchestra Repertoires 1842-1970

Now available on CPANDA:

  • Americans and the Arts III [1980]
  • Quick Fact: "Who Attends Classical Music Concerts?"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released February 13, 2005


Americans and the Arts III [1980]

Americans and the Arts III [1980] measured arts attendance, participation, and support as well as attitudes about artists, arts education, funding of arts and cultural institutions, and childhood exposure to the arts.

Americans and the Arts III allows analysis of questions such as:

Do you ever go to any live performances of plays, musical comedies, pantomime, or other kinds of theater, or not?

How important do you feel it is to have more and better arts and cultural facilities for both the performing and the visual arts -- very important, somewhat important, of minor importance, or not at all important?

The responses to these and other questions are available from Americans and the Arts III [1980]


New Quick Fact: "Who Attends Classical Music Concerts?"

The latest CPANDA Quick Fact explores the demographics of American adults who attended a classical music concert in the prior 12 months. The data are from The Classical Music Consumer Segmentation Study 2002: National Survey, which was sponsored by The Knight Foundation and conducted by Audience Insight LLC. According to the study, 16% of adults in the United States attended a classical music concert in the 12 months prior to the survey. The Quick Fact further examines attendance rates by education level, age, and whether the household has children. Results are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

New data: The aDvANCE Project [United States]

Now available on CPANDA:

  • The aDvANCE Project [United States]
  • New Quick Fact: "Transitioning From a Professional Dance Career"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released January 13, 2005


The aDvANCE Project [United States]

The aDvANCE Project [United States], conducted by the Research Center for Arts and Culture, was undertaken in order to assess the transition of dancers to post-performance careers. The survey was based on a random sample of current and former professional dancers in the United States. The survey is one component of an international study, which included surveys of current and former dancers in Australia and Switzerland, profiles of dance activity in 11 countries, and descriptions of significant dance career transition programs.

The aDvANCE Project [United States] allows analysis of questions such as:

Do you intend to undertake further education or training to equip you for a working life beyond transition?

Compared to your annual income during your final years as a dancer, what was/is your income twelve months after transition?

The responses to these and other questions are available from The aDvANCE Project


Quick Fact: "Transitioning From a Professional Dance Career"

According to data from The aDvANCE Project [United States], while just 1% of former dancers stated that "wanting a new career" contributed to ending their dance careers, 45% of current dancers expected it to be significant reason. Health (35%) and age (22%) were the most common reasons given by former dancers for ending their active dance careers. Further results in the Quick Fact include a comparison of the career transition challenges expected by current dancers with the challenges cited by former dancers. Results are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

New data: Americans and the Arts I [1973] and II [1975]

Now available on CPANDA:

  • Americans and the Arts I [1973] and II [1975]
  • American Perceptions of Artists [2002]: National and Metropolitan Subsets
  • New Quick Fact: "How Do Attitudes Towards Artists Vary Across Communities?"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released December 17, 2004


Americans and the Arts I [1973] and II [1975]

Americans and the Arts I [1973] and II [1975] were the first of a series of studies conducted by Louis Harris and Associates. The series measured arts attendance, participation, and support as well as attitudes about artists, arts education, funding of arts and cultural institutions, television and the arts, and children and the arts.

Americans and the Arts allows analysis of questions such as:

How important to you is it to have an easily accessible concert hall where music or opera is performed -- very important, somewhat important, not very important, or not at all important?

Did you have any teachers when you were in school who really helped to develop your interest in artistic or creative things, or not?

The responses to these and other questions from Americans and the Arts are available at: Americans and the Arts


Americans Perceptions of Artists [2002]: National and Metropolitan Subsets

American Perceptions of Artists [2002] was a benchmark study of the general public's opinions about the lifestyles and work of artists in the United States. The series consists of a national survey of adults in the continental United States and nine local surveys conducted in the following metropolitan areas: Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C.

American Perceptions of Artists [2002] allows analysis of questions such as:

Many adults who are not actively involved with the arts, did draw, write, act, or play an instrument while growing up. Did you do any of these or similar activities while growing up?

Altogether, about how many artists do you know?

The responses to these and other questions from American Perceptions of Artists [2002] are available at: American Perceptions of Artists


Quick Fact: "How Do Attitudes Towards Artists Vary Across Communities?"

According to data from American Perceptions of Artists [2002], a larger percentage of San Francisco area residents (41%) stated that artists contribute a lot to society compared with Americans nationwide (27%). In addition, more San Francisco residents knew an artist in each of six genres than did residents of any other metropolitan area. Further results in the Quick Fact include a more detailed comparison between residents of Boston, New York, Houston, Los Angeles, Chicago, Cleveland, Seattle, Washington, DC and San Francisco. Results are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) 2002 -- Data Sets Now Available for Austin and Washington DC

Now available on CPANDA:

  • Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) 2002-- Data Sets Now Available for Austin and Washington DC
  • New Quick Fact -- Findings from 2002 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA)

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released Dec. 3, 2003


The Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) ( http://www.operaamerica.org/parc/) project has just released the data sets from the sixth and seventh communities it has studied in its three-year project to measure participation in and support for the arts in 10 communities across the country. Data sets are now available for Austin and Washington DC.

In February 2004, PARC will release data from three additional sites -- Boston, Minneapolis/St. Paul, and Sarasota. In April 2003, PARC released data from Alaska (urban locations), Cincinnati, Denver, Pittsburgh, and Seattle.

The Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) is an unprecedented partnership of five arts service organizations -- the Association of Performing Arts Presenters, the American Symphony Orchestra League, Dance/USA, OPERA America, and Theatre Communications Group -- working together improve and coordinate the ways performing arts organizations gather information on their sector. The PARC project is coordinated by OPERA America ( http://www.operaamerica.org/)and supported by a $2.7 million grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts ( http://www.pewtrusts.org/). Reports detailing the major findings from the PARC surveys are available at http://www.operaamerica.org/parc/.

To access the PARC data sets through CPANDA, please see Performing Arts Research Coalition 2002 for more information.


A new Quick Fact is also available at CPANDA this month, summarizing key findings from the Survey of Public Participation in the Arts 2002 (SPPA), released in July 2003. According to the SPPA 2002, about 40 percent of the adult population of the United States (an estimated 81 million Americans) attended at least one of these seven arts activities -- jazz, classical music, opera, musical plays, plays, ballet, or art museums -- in the 12 months prior to the survey.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

New data: American Perceptions of Artists [2002]

Now available on CPANDA:

  • American Perceptions of Artists [2002]
  • New Quick Fact: "How Does the American Public Feel About Artists?"
  • New Help Feature: "How to Read the Results of Your Analysis"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released November 11, 2004


American Perceptions of Artists [2002]

American Perceptions of Artists [2002], a study sponsored by the Urban Institute and conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International, measured perceptions of artists by the American public nationwide and in nine selected metropolitan areas.

American Perceptions of Artists [2002] allows analysis of questions such as:

How do you think artists affect your local area, if at all? Do artists make your local area a BETTER place to live, a WORSE place to live, or don't they have much effect either way?

Altogether, about how many artists do you know?

The responses to these and other questions from American Perceptions of Artists [2002] are available at: American Perceptions of Artists [2002]


Quick Fact: "How Does the American Public Feel About Artists?"

According to data from American Perceptions of Artists [2002], 27% of respondents from the national sample say that artists contribute a lot to society while 26% say that artists contribute only a little or nothing. Additional results reported in the Quick Fact include perceptions of the relative difficulty of the lives of performing artists compared to non-artists and the percentage of respondents who have been moved or inspired by art works such as music, film, visual arts, and fiction. Results are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.


New Help Feature: "How to Read the Results of Your Analysis"

CPANDA has a new guide to help users understand online data analysis. "How to Read the Results of Your Analysis" explains what you will see after submitting a query in the Quick Analysis or the Advanced Analysis Tool.

" How to Read the Results of Your Analysis"

New data: Reporting the Arts II [2003]

Now available on CPANDA:

  • Reporting the Arts II [2003]
  • New Quick Fact: "How Has Newspaper Coverage of Arts-and-Culture Changed From 1998 to 2003?"
  • New Quick Fact: "What is the Focus of Arts-and-Culture Content in Newspapers?"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released October 6, 2004


Reporting the Arts II [2003]

Reporting the Arts II, conducted by the National Arts Journalism Program, examines the arts-and-culture coverage by 17 metropolitan and three national daily newspapers. A supplementary dataset, Reporting the Arts II: Sections [2003], classifies the sections of each newspaper according to one of seven categories (news, business, sports, daily arts and lifestyles, weekend arts, non-arts features, and advertising) and provides page counts for each section.

Reporting the Arts II [2003] allows analysis of questions such as:

How many articles on arts-and-culture were prominently displayed?

What percentage of newspapers printed articles about international arts-and-culture topics?

The responses to these and other questions from Reporting the Arts II [2003] are available at: http://www.cpanda.orgprofiles/rta


Quick Fact: "How Has Newspaper Coverage of Arts-and-Culture Changed From 1998 to 2003?"

Based on analysis by the National Arts Journalism Program, metropolitan daily newspapers have decreased the average space for arts-and-culture coverage from 1998 to 2003. However, during the same period arts-and-culture coverage has increased relative to other topics. The relative increase and absolute decrease in arts-and-culture coverage are detailed in the Quick Fact.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.


Quick Fact: "What is the Focus of Arts-and-Culture Content in Newspapers?"

Newspaper coverage of arts-and-culture disciplines such as movies, music, performing arts, and television are compared in a new CPANDA Quick Fact. Journalistic content (articles) in each discipline is measured, as well as total content (articles and listings). Results are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

New data: State of the First Amendment 2004

Now available on CPANDA:

  • State of the First Amendment 2004
  • Quick Fact Update: "How Supportive are Americans of Freedom of Expression?"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released September 21, 2004


State of the First Amendment 2004

The State of the First Amendment 2004 is the seventh in a series of surveys, conducted for the First Amendment Center by the Center for Survey Research and Analysis at the University of Connecticut, that measure public attitudes regarding current levels of freedom of speech, the press, and religion in the U.S., levels of tolerance for various types of public expression and journalistic behaviors, and awareness of First Amendment freedoms. In addition to these core questions, the 2004 survey gauged public opinion on topics such as regulation of sexual content in the media and recent scandals involving made-up stories and facts at major news organizations.

State of the First Amendment 2004 allows analysis of questions such as:

Overall, how would you rate the job that the American educational system does in teaching students about First Amendment freedoms?

What is your opinion of the current amount of government regulation of entertainment programming on radio--too much, too little, or about right?

The responses to these and other questions are available from State of the First Amendment 2004.


Updated Quick Fact: "How Supportive are Americans of Freedom of Expression?"

Americans' support of freedom of artistic expression is reported in an updated CPANDA Quick Fact. Attitudes are measured for specific types of expression, such as singing songs with potentially offensive lyrics, as well as more general assessments of current First Amendment freedoms. The data are from the State of the First Amendment surveys, a series of studies conducted from 1997 to 2004 (except for 1998) for the First Amendment Center by the Center for Survey Research and Analysis at the University of Connecticut. The Quick Fact reports both current findings and trend data from all seven waves of the survey. Results are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

New data: Americans and the Arts VI [1992]

Now available on CPANDA:

  • Americans and the Arts VI [1992]
  • Community Indicators Survey: Cumulative [1999, 2002]
  • Quick Fact: "How Supportive are Americans of Arts Education in the Public Schools?"

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released August 12, 2004


Americans and the Arts VI [1992]

Americans and the Arts VI [1992] measured arts attendance, participation, and support as well as attitudes about artists, arts education, funding of arts and cultural institutions, television and the arts, and children and the arts.

Americans and the Arts VI allows analysis of questions such as:

How important do you think it is to businesses and the economy of this community to have facilities such as museums, theaters, and concert halls available -- very important, somewhat important, of minor importance, or not at all important?

If there were no arts available here in this community, would you personally miss them very much, only somewhat, or hardly at all?

The responses to these and other questions are available from the Americans and the Arts VI [1992] survey.


Community Indicators Survey: Cumulative [1999, 2002]

The Community Indicators Project conducted 27 surveys in 1999 and 37 surveys in 2002 in order to document the social health of communities in which the Knight brothers published newspapers. The national, community, and regional surveys have already been individually available to researchers. Now, researchers using CPANDA may access and download a cumulative file containing the complete collection of surveys for either year.

The Community Indicators Surveys asked, among other things:

In the past 12 months have you volunteered your time to an arts or cultural group, such as a museum, theater or music group?

Find more questions in the Community Indicators Survey 1999: Cumulative and the Community Indicators Survey 2002: Cumulative.


New Quick Fact: "How Supportive are Americans of Arts Education in the Public Schools?"

Americans' support of arts education in the public schools is reported in a new CPANDA Quick Fact. The data are from Americans and the Arts VI, a survey conducted in 1992 by Louis Harris and Associates. Support for arts education is reported for all respondents, and the data are also examined by the respondent's education level. Results for both analyses are available in downloadable graphs.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

New data: General Social Survey 2000

Now available on CPANDA:

  • General Social Survey 2000, including Information Society and Freedom Modules

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released July 21, 2004


The General Social Survey 2000 contains information from the general public on a wide variety of subjects, including attitudes toward social issues, religion, education, jobs and the economy, government and other institutions, politics, and policy issues. Of particular interest to cultural policy researchers are question modules on Information Society and Freedom.

The Information Society Module allows analysis of questions such as:

  • Have you ever purchased a recording as a result of hearing it on the Web?
  • Have you ever used the Web to download a musical sound recording to your own computer?

The Freedom Module asked, among other things:

  • How much freedom do you think Americans have today? Would you say they have complete freedom, a great deal of freedom, a moderate degree of freedom, not much freedom, or no freedom at all?
  • Do you think Americans today have more freedom, less freedom, or about the same amount of freedom as in the past?

The responses to these and other questions from the GSS 2000 are available from the The General Social Survey 2000


Quick Fact Update "How Much Does Attendance at Performing Arts Events Vary Across Communities?" (new analysis comparing attendance rates across all ten communities that participated in the Performing Arts Research Coalition surveys)

Performing arts attendance in ten communities is reported in a newly updated CPANDA Quick Fact. The data are based on the results of household surveys conducted in 2002 by the Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) in Alaska (urban areas), Austin, Boston, Cincinnati, Denver, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Pittsburgh, Sarasota, Seattle, and Washington D.C. Performing arts attendance, including separate attendance rates for symphony, theatre, dance, and opera, is compared across the ten communities in the survey. Results are also available in downloadable graphs.

Arts attendance rates reported in the PARC community surveys are also compared with the rates reported in the 2002 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts. The Quick Fact points to factors in the different survey designs that may have contributed to apparent inconsistencies in reported arts participation.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

New data: A Survey of the Arts in Everyday Life 2002

Now available on CPANDA:

  • A Survey of the Arts in Everyday Life 2002 - Data Set Now Available
  • "The Arts in America: A Pastiche of Empirical Research" - Presentation Given at the National Performing Arts Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, June 12, 2004


Released June 16, 2004


One of the first empirical studies to attempt to document arts activities in "informal" settings, A Survey of the Arts in Everyday Life 2002 examined the involvement of Chicago-area individuals in activities outside of mainstream art venues, such as acting in community theater, singing in a church choir, writing poetry at the local library, or painting portraits in a home studio. Participants in informal arts activities in twelve different settings were asked about their art work, the characteristics of art groups to which they belong, their interactions with other artists, their working situation as artists, their opinions concerning arts opportunities in their neighborhoods, and their levels of participation in various arts, cultural, and civic activities. Partial funding for this study was provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation ( http://www.macfdn.org/), the Rockefeller Foundation ( http://www.rockfound.org), the National Endowment for the Arts ( http://www.nea.gov/), the Illinois Arts Council ( http://www.state.il.us/agency/iac/), the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, the Urban Institute/Arts and Culture Indicators in Community Building Project (ACIP) ( http://www.urban.org/nnip/acip.html), and Columbia College, Chicago ( http://www.colum.edu/).

The data set for this study is now accessible through CPANDA. Please see A Survey of the Arts in Everyday Life 2002 for more information.


Also new at CPANDA this month is a presentation (in PowerPoint format) given on June 12, 2004 by researchers from the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies (a partner of CPANDA) on "The Arts in America: A Pastiche of Empirical Research." The occasion for the presentation was the first National Performing Arts Conference in Pittsburgh, PA. The presentation was given by Toqir Mukhtar, Research Project Director at CACPS, Steven Tepper, Deputy Director of CACPS, and Larry McGill, Director of Research & Planning at CPANDA. The presentation summarized key findings from recent research studies on the economic & social impact of the arts, patterns of cultural participation in the U.S., and other recent research on artists, arts organizations & support for the arts. It also included a brief overview of U.S. demographic projections from 2000 - 2050.

Among the findings discussed in the presentation:

  • Participation in arts and cultural activities has declined slightly in the past 20 years and some research suggests that even the greatest fans of the arts are not participating in the numbers one would expect given their expressed affinity for a particular art form. Nevertheless, the arts remain a source of great enjoyment for most people, and Americans are participating in the arts in a wide variety of venues, including religious congregations, libraries, and other nontraditional locations.
  • The number of artists in the U.S. has tripled in the last 30 years, while the number of performing arts organizations has nearly doubled. Consumer spending on the arts increased by more than 30 percent during the 1990's (adjusted for inflation), and giving to the arts reached an all-time high of $12.2 billion in 2002. But adjusted for inflation, the proportion of consumer spending on the arts relative to other forms of recreation has declined from 1.9% in 1991 to 1.3% in 2001, and giving to the arts has dropped from 8% of all giving in 1995 to just 5% in 2002.
  • The U.S. population is expected to grow to more than 400 million by the year 2050. Along with continued growth, the population will become progressively older and increasingly diverse. By 2050, people of color (that is, everyone except non-Hispanic whites) are expected to make up 50% of the U.S. population. Fully one-quarter of the population will be Hispanic. In younger age groups, diversity will increase at an even more rapid pace.

Read the introduction to the presentation or download the PowerPoint slides

New data: National Congregations Study 1998

Now available on CPANDA:

  • National Congregations Study 1998 - Data Set Now Available

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released May 12, 2004


The 1998 National Congregations Study (NCS) is the first nationally representative survey of U.S. congregations. Conducted in conjunction with the 1998 General Social Survey (GSS), the NCS gathered information about congregational affiliation, size, facilities, worship practices, building use, and programs. Topics relating to the relationship between congregations and the arts include:

  • musical and other artistic activities conducted both during and outside of worship services,
  • use of the building for artistic performances or exhibits unaffiliated with the congregation, and
  • attendance at outside arts events by congregational groups.

Data collection for the NCS was supported by a major grant from the Lilly Endowment, Inc., and by supplemental grants from Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc., The Louisville Institute, The Nonprofit Sector Research Fund of The Aspen Institute, and The Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. The study was designed by University of Arizona professor Mark Chaves and conducted by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago.

The data set for this study is now accessible through CPANDA. Please see National Congregations Study 1998 for more information.

New data: Community Indicators Surveys [1999 - 2002

Now available on CPANDA:

  • Community Indicators Surveys [1999 - 2002] - 64 Data Sets Now Available;
  • New Feature - FACTOID, A User-Friendly Data Analysis Tool

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released April 22, 2004


The Community Indicators Project was undertaken by the Knight Foundation ( http://www.knightfdn.org) to document the social health of the 26 communities in which the Knight brothers published newspapers. Local area surveys were conducted in each of the 26 communities in both 1999 and 2002. In 2002, a number of the local area surveys were supplemented with regional surveys or surveys of a neighboring city. National surveys were also conducted in order to provide comparative benchmark measures. The surveys measured citizens' civic engagement and attitudes concerning seven topic areas: education, arts and culture, children and social welfare, community development, homelessness, literacy, and citizenship. Questions relating specifically to arts and culture include frequency of attendance at arts events or museums and satisfaction with arts and cultural opportunities. The study was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates ( http://www.psra.com) and funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

The data sets for this project are now accessible through CPANDA. Please see Community Indicators Survey [1999-2002] for more information.


Also new this month -- CPANDA users wishing to perform simple data analyses may choose between FACTOID (the Frequencies and Cross-Tabulations Online Interactive Data tool) and the SDA advanced analysis tool, which had previously been CPANDA's only online analysis option. FACTOID allows users to obtain simple frequency distributions (i.e., basic survey results) and cross-tabulations (e.g., survey results broken out by demographic groups) through a simplified analysis form, which walks users step-by-step through the process. Where applicable, data have already been weighted, so that the analyses yield results that are representative of the population sampled in a particular study.

New data: Community Arts Survey 1998

Now available on CPANDA:

  • Community Arts Survey 1998 Data Sets Now Available

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released March 10, 2004


In 1998, the Heinz Endowments ( http://www.heinz.org) and the Pew Charitable Trusts ( http://www.pewtrust.org) partnered to examine patterns of local arts participation in Pennsylvania's two largest cities, Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. The surveys gauged levels of awareness, interest, and participation in a range of nonprofit arts, cultural, and other leisure activities. Data were also collected on childhood participation in the arts, barriers to adult participation, and attendance at specific local venues. Each data set consists of more than 1,000 completed interviews with adults living in the Philadelphia and Pittsburgh Metropolitan Statistical Areas.

The data sets for this study are now accessible through CPANDA. Please see Community Arts Survey 1998 for more information.

CPANDA Archives 100th Data Set, Enhances Geographic Browsing Feature

Now available on CPANDA:

  • CPANDA Archives 100th Data Set, Enhances Geographic Browsing Feature
  • New Local Market Data Sets Available -- Performing Arts Research Coalition 2002 (3 data sets) and Classical Music Consumer Segmentation Study 2002 (30 data sets)
  • New Research Guide Available -- Arts & Cultural Organizations: Overview of Available Data

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released Feb. 5, 2004


With the release of 33 data sets this month, CPANDA has now processed and made available to the public a total of 100 data sets since the project was launched 10 months ago, in April 2003. For a complete listing of data sets available through CPANDA, please see " Browse Data Archive by Title."

Data sets may also be conveniently browsed by geographic area through a point-and-click U.S. map. To use this feature, please see "Browse by Geographic Location." EDITOR NOTE: this feature has been deprecated.


This month, CPANDA is pleased to announce the release of data sets from the eighth, ninth, and tenth communities studied by The Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) ( http://www.operaamerica.org/parc/) in its three-year project to measure participation in and support for the arts in 10 communities across the country. Data sets are now available for Boston, Sarasota, and Minneapolis/St. Paul.

Previously, PARC released data from Alaska (urban locations), Austin, Cincinnati, Denver, Pittsburgh, Seattle, and Washington DC.

The Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) is an unprecedented partnership of five arts service organizations -- the Association of Performing Arts Presenters, the American Symphony Orchestra League, Dance/USA, OPERA America, and Theatre Communications Group -- working together to improve and coordinate the ways performing arts organizations gather information on their sector. The PARC project is coordinated by OPERA America ( http://www.operaamerica.org/)and supported by a $2.7 million grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts ( http://www.pewtrusts.org). Reports detailing the major findings from the PARC surveys are available at http://www.operaamerica.org/parc/.

To access the PARC data sets through CPANDA, please see Performing Arts Research Coalition 2002


Also new at CPANDA this month are 30 local market data sets from the Classical Music Consumer Segmentation Study, previously only available as parts of larger data sets. The Classical Music Consumer Segmentation Study collected data in 15 American cities on how Americans relate to classical music and to their local orchestras. The study was commissioned by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation ( http://www.knightfdn.org/default.asp) and by 15 orchestras as part of the Knight Foundation's Magic of Music funding initiative. The study was conducted by Audience Insight LLC ( http://www.audienceinsight.com/) and included:

  • a national telephone survey of 2,200 adults
  • telephone surveys of 11,300 randomly-selected individuals in the 15 market areas
  • mail surveys of 1,500 orchestra ticket buyers in each market

Local market data sets from both the community surveys and the orchestra ticket-buyers surveys are now available for each of the following sites: Brooklyn, Charlotte, Denver, Detroit, Fort Wayne (IN), Kansas City, Long Beach, New Orleans, Miami/Dade, Portland (OR), Philadelphia, St. Louis, St. Paul, San Antonio, and Wichita. A report on key findings from the study is available from the Knight Foundation at http://www.knightfoundation.org/dotAsset/131783.pdf

To access the local market data sets from the Classical Music Consumer Segmentation Study, please see Classical Music Consumer Segmentation Study 2002.


A new Research Guide is also available at CPANDA this month, providing an overview of data available (in CPANDA and elsewhere) on arts and cultural organizations. Please see " Arts & Cultural Organizations: An Overview of Available Data," for more information.

New data: State of the First Amendment 2003

  • State of the First Amendment 2003 -- Data Set and Quick Fact Now Available

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released Dec. 3, 2003


The State of the First Amendment 2003 is the sixth in a series of surveys on public attitudes toward the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution - the freedoms of speech, religion, and the press, and the rights of assembly and petition. Conducted annually for the First Amendment Center by the Center for Survey Research and Analysis at the University of Connecticut, the survey serves as a barometer for assessing levels of public tolerance for artistic, political, religious, and other types of public expression.

The data set for this study (and previous waves of the study) is now accessible through CPANDA. Please see State of the First Amendment [1997-2003] for more information.

Along with the data set, an overview of key findings from the State of the First Amendment surveys is also available in the CPANDA Quick Fact, " How Supportive are Americans of Freedom of Expression? " While the public is strongly supportive of freedom of expression in the abstract, the surveys show that significant numbers of Americans (in some cases, a majority) would impose restrictions on particular forms of expression. For example, 55% of Americans polled in the 2003 survey said that people should not be allowed to display potentially offensive art in a public place, and 36% said that musicians should not be allowed to sing songs with offensive lyrics.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.

New data: Arts & Religion Survey 1999

  • Arts & Religion Survey 1999 -- Data Set and Quick Fact Now Available
  • New Feature -- Creating Customized Question Lists

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released Nov. 5, 2003


The Arts & Religion Survey 1999 is the most extensive study to date on the role of the arts in American religious life. One of the last Gallup Organization studies to employ in-person, in-house interviews, the study collected data from 1,530 Americans on their religious, creative, and arts-related activities; their attitudes toward the arts, religion, and spirituality; the role of the arts in religious contexts; and the relationship between art and spirituality. The study was designed by Princeton University professor Robert Wuthnow.

The data set for this study is now accessible through CPANDA. Please see Arts & Religion Survey 1999 for more information.

Along with the data set, an overview of key findings from the Arts & Religion Survey is also available in the CPANDA Quick Fact, " Places of Worship as Venues for Artistic Activities ." According to the survey, about six out of every seven places of worship (85%) sponsored at least one of the following artistic activities during the year preceding the survey--an adult choir; a children's choir; a drama or skit; a musical performance (outside of worship services); an art festival or craft fair; a group discussion of art, literature, or poetry; a liturgical dance performance; or private music lessons. While the most common forms of artistic activity were adult and children's choirs, found in 71% and 58% of congregations respectively, nearly half (47%) sponsored a drama or skit and a similar percentage (45%) sponsored a musical performance (outside of worship services) during the year prior to the survey.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.


Also new this month -- CPANDA users now have the ability to create customized lists of survey questions while searching CPANDA, or while browsing the codebook for a particular data set. Once a customized question list has been created, it can be printed or downloaded to the user's personal computer.

CPANDA Releases Data from National and Local Profiles of Cultural Support

  • CPANDA Releases Data from National and Local Profiles of Cultural Support

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released October 3, 2003


CPANDA is pleased to announce the release of the data sets from the National and Local Profiles of Cultural Support project. The National and Local Profiles of Cultural Support study was funded byThe Pew Charitable Trusts ( http://www.pewtrusts.org) and conducted by Americans for the Arts ( http://www.AmericansForTheArts.org) and The Ohio State University ( "http://arted.osu.edu/APA/index.php.) to document the patterns and sources of support to the nonprofit arts and culture sector in the United States. A national survey of nonprofit arts organizations details the presence and prominence of 22 public, private, and earned revenue categories. Additional survey research conducted in ten diverse communities demonstrates both the variations and the similarities in arts support in various locales. Taken together, these investigations contribute four new and fundamental tools to the arts policy discussion:

  • A research-based benchmark of the patterns and sources of financial support to nonprofit arts organizations -- providing an answer to the question, How is the arts and cultural sector supported in the United States?
  • The first systematic, multi-city examination of how non-arts government agencies support the arts. Results from this investigation suggest that local government investment in the arts has been significantly underestimated.
  • The development of a methodical approach to defining what kinds of organizations are included in the universe of the arts and cultural sector-one that allows for local variation as well as facilitates site-to-site comparisons.
  • A comparative examination of the different parts of the nonprofit arts and cultural sector and how, for example, service and support organizations are distinct from producing and presenting organizations.

All twelve data sets are accessible through CPANDA. Please see National and Local Profiles of Cultural Support 1999 for more information.

New data: Jazz Artists Study 2001

  • Jazz Artists Study 2001 -- Data Sets and Quick Fact Now Available;
  • New Feature --Geographical Listing of CPANDA Data Sets

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released Oct. 1, 2003


The Jazz Artists Study 2001 was the first to collect detailed information specifically on the working and living situations of jazz musicians. Data were collected from more than 2,000 jazz musicians in four metropolitan areas -- New York, San Francisco, New Orleans, and Detroit. Employing an innovative methodological strategy called "respondent-driven sampling," designed specifically to locate members of hard-to-reach populations, this was also the first study to provide meaningful estimates of the number of jazz musicians working in three of the communities studied. The study was conducted by the Research Center for Arts and Culture (RCAC) ( http://www.tc.columbia.edu/centers/rcac/) at Columbia University under a cooperative agreement with the National Endowment for the Arts ( http://www.arts.endow.gov/) and the San Francisco Study Center ( http://www.studycenter.org/).

The data set for this study is now accessible through CPANDA. Please see Study of Jazz Artists 2001 for more information.

Along with the data set, an overview of key findings from the Jazz Artists study is also available in the CPANDA Quick Fact, " How many jazz musicians are there? " According to the study, it is estimated that there are 33,003 jazz musicians in New York, 18,733 in San Francisco, and 1,723 in New Orleans.

Note (Nov. 2006): Quick Facts are moving to the website of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University. Links will be provided once the content is available on their website.


Also new this month -- CPANDA users now have the ability to easily locate data sets specific to particular parts of the country. A state-by-state listing of data sets held by CPANDA may be found at http://www.cpanda.org/browseState.xq. EDITOR NOTE: this feature has been deprecated.

New data: ALA Study on Cultural Programs for Adults in Public Libraries

What's New - September 2003

  • ALA Study on Cultural Programs for Adults in Public Libraries -- Data Set and Quick Fact Now Available


Released Sept. 3, 2003


The 1998 American Library Association (ALA) study on Cultural Programs for Adults in Public Libraries was the first to gather systematic data on the scope and nature of cultural programs in U.S. public libraries. Data were collected from 1,229 public libraries on the types of adult cultural programming offered at each library, program attendance and funding, collaboration with other organizations on cultural programs, the cultural role of the library, and the relative availability of cultural programming in the community served by the library. The study was conducted for the American Library Association by the Library Research Center in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.

The data set for this study is now accessible through CPANDA. Please see Cultural Programs for Adults in Public Libraries [1998] for more information.


Along with the data set, an overview of key findings from the ALA study is also available in the CPANDA Quick Fact, " Public Libraries as Venues for Cultural Programming ." According to the ALA study, the vast majority of public libraries (86%) offered some form of cultural programming for adults in 1997-98. While the most common forms of programming were literary in nature, a sizable minority of libraries also played host to lecture series (44%), musical performances (42%), dramatic performances (23%), and dance performances (14%).

New data: Survey of Public Participation in the Arts 2002

  • Survey of Public Participation in the Arts 2002 Data Set Now Available


Released July 16, 2003


Coincident with the initial release of findings from the National Endowment for the Arts' 2002 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA), we are pleased to announce the availability of the 2002 SPPA data set through CPANDA. The fifth in a series of national studies on arts participation sponsored by the NEA since 1982, the SPPA is the definitive study of public participation in the arts in the United States.

The 2002 SPPA updates trend data on arts participation in the following areas:

  • Participation in, and frequency of attending, art performances and events in ten benchmark categories: jazz music, classical music, opera, musicals, plays (nonmusical), ballet, other dance, art museums, arts-crafts fairs, and historical park/monument sites
  • Exposure to the arts via the media, both broadcast and recorded (including DVDs, for the first time in 2002)
  • Leisure reading
  • Art making and performance
  • Music and artistic preferences

The 2002 SPPA also includes questions asked for the first time (in the SPPA) on length of travel to artistic events and computer usage related to artistic information.

With a sample size of more than 17,000, the 2002 SPPA offers a wealth of opportunities for arts and cultural policy researchers to investigate the nature of public participation in the arts in the United States.

For an overview of the NEA's findings from the 2002 SPPA, see the NEA Research Division Notes at http://www.nea.gov/research/ResearchNotes_chrono.html

  • National Endowment for the Arts. 2003. "2002 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts." Research Note no. 81. Washington, D.C.: National Endowment for the Arts.
  • Nichols, Bonnie. 2003. "Demographic Characteristics of Arts Attendance, 2002." Research Note no. 82. Washington, D.C.: National Endowment for the Arts.

The data set is accessible through CPANDA. Please see Survey of Public Participation in the Arts 2002 for more information. For access to previous waves of the SPPA (1982, 1985, 1992, and 1997), see Survey of Public Participation in the Arts [1982-2002] (http://www.cpanda.org/cpanda/study/c00016).

New data: General Social Survey 2002 Now Available

  • General Social Survey 2002 Now Available

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released July 2, 2003


Described as "a national resource," the General Social Survey (GSS) is arguably the most comprehensive systematic data collection effort ever undertaken to understand U.S. social characteristics, attitudes, and trends. Conducted annually between 1972 and 1994 (except for 1979, 1981, and 1992) and biennially thereafter by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, the GSS collects information from the general public on a wide variety of subjects, including attitudes toward social issues, religion, education, jobs and the economy, government and other institutions, politics, and policy issues.

Of particular interest to arts and cultural policy researchers, the 2002 General Social Survey includes a battery of questions focused on culture and the arts. This "Culture Module" includes questions on musical preferences, attendance at arts events, and personal engagement in artistic activities. Another module, on the "Information Society," includes questions on the use of the Internet to obtain information about the arts. The 2002 Culture Module is the third such module to have been included in the GSS in the past decade. Similar modules appeared in the 1993 and 1998 General Social Surveys, both of which are also available through CPANDA.

More background about the General Social Surveys and about the National Opinion Research Center may be found at http://www.norc.uchicago.edu/projects/gensoc1.asp

The data set is accessible through CPANDA. Please see General Social Survey 2002: Culture Module for more information.

New data: Pew Biennial Media Consumption Survey

  • Pew Biennial Media Consumption Survey Data Sets Now Available
  • New Quick Fact -- Foundation Giving to Arts & Culture

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released June 3, 2003


The 1998, 2000, and 2002 Pew Media Consumption Surveys offer arts and cultural policy researchers a unique opportunity to explore the media usage patterns and preferences of people interested in news about arts and culture. The Media Consumption Surveys are an example of a research resource that may be easily overlooked by arts and cultural policy researchers because they contain but a single question related to arts and culture. But the inclusion of that question in the context of a survey about people's media usage habits allows researchers to compare and contrast followers of arts and cultural news with followers of other types of news, and to learn more about how people interested in arts and culture might be reached through the media.

The Biennial Media Consumption Surveys are conducted every other year by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. More information about the surveys and about the Pew Research Center may be found at http://people-press.org/


Also new on CPANDA this month is an overview of data on foundation giving to the arts in the CPANDA Quick Fact, " How much do foundations contribute to arts and culture? " Foundation giving to the arts peaked at an estimated $3.7 billion in 2000, according to research conducted by the Foundation Center. For more information about the Foundation Center and its research services, see http://fdncenter.org/

All three data sets are accessible through CPANDA. Please see Biennial Media Consumption Survey [1998-2002] for more information.

Note: These data sets have been temporarily removed for adminstrative purposes.

New data: Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC)

  • Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) Data Sets Now Available

Press contact: Larry McGill, Director of Research and Planning
(609) 258-6437
Released April 2, 2003


The first in-depth look at performing arts attendance at the local level in ten years, the Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) project has just released the data sets from the first five communities studied in its three-year project to measure the level of participation in and support for the arts in 10 communities across the country. Data are now available for Alaska (urban locations), Cincinnati, Denver, Pittsburgh, and Seattle. Interviews were conducted with respondents from 800 randomly selected households in each community, on issues of critical importance to the performing arts:

  • How many people attend performing arts events and who are they?
  • How do attendees differ from non-attendees?
  • What prevents people from attending performing arts events more often?
  • In what ways do the performing arts add value to people's lives?
  • In what ways do the performing arts add value to the community?

The Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) is an unprecedented partnership of five arts service organizations -- the Association of Performing Arts Presenters, the American Symphony Orchestra League, Dance/USA, OPERA America, and Theatre Communications Group -- working together to improve and coordinate the ways performing arts organizations gather information on their sector. The PARC project is coordinated by OPERA America and supported by a $2.7 million grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts ( http://www.pewtrusts.org).

For a quick overview of some key findings from the PARC household surveys, see the CPANDA Quick Fact, How much does attendance at performing arts events vary across communities? A report detailing the major findings from these surveys, The Value of the Performing Arts in Five Communities, is available at http://www.operaamerica.org/parc.

All five data sets are accessible through CPANDA. Please see Performing Arts Research Coalition 2002 for more information.